Document Type

Article

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Disciplines

Bacteria | Bacteriology | Biology | Biotechnology | Cell and Developmental Biology | Diseases | Genetics and Genomics | Immunology and Infectious Disease | Medical Biochemistry | Medical Microbiology | Medical Sciences | Microbiology | Organisms | Virology | Virus Diseases | Viruses

CIT Disciplines

1.6 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Microbiology; Virology; Biochemistry and molecular biology; Biomaterials; 3. MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; 3.3 HEALTH SCIENCES; Epidemiology; Technologies involving identifying the functioning of DNA,; Pharrnacogenomics; Biomaterials

Publication Details

Frontiers in cellular and molecular biology

Abstract

It is well documented that open reading frames containing high GC content show poor expression in A+T rich hosts. Specifically, G+C-rich codon usage is a limiting factor in heterologous expression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) proteins using Lactobacillus salivarius. However, re-engineering opening reading frames through synonymous substitutions can offset codon bias and greatly enhance MAP protein production in this host. In this report, we demonstrate that codon-usage manipulation of MAP2121c can enhance the heterologous expression of the major membrane protein (MMP), analogous to the form in which it is produced natively by MAP bacilli. When heterologously over-expressed, antigenic determinants were preserved in synthetic MMP proteins as shown by monoclonal antibody mediated ELISA. Moreover, MMP is a membrane protein in MAP, which is also targeted to the cellular surface of recombinant L. salivarius at levels comparable to MAP. Additionally, we previously engineered MAP3733c (encoding MptD) and show herein that MptD displays the tendency to associate with the cytoplasmic membrane boundary under confocal microscopy and the intracellularly accumulated protein selectively adheres to the MptD-specific bacteriophage fMptD. This work demonstrates there is potential for L. salivarius as a viable antigen delivery vehicle for MAP, which may provide an effective mucosal vaccine against Johne's disease.

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