Document Type

Article

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Disciplines

Animal Sciences | Biology | Food Science | Genetics and Genomics | Health and Medical Administration | Immunology and Infectious Disease | Medical Sciences | Medicine and Health Sciences | Microbiology | Nutrition | Pharmacology, Toxicology and Environmental Health | Public Health | Research Methods in Life Sciences | Veterinary Medicine

CIT Disciplines

Environmental sciences; 1.6 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Zoology; 1.7 OTHER NATURAL SCIENCES; 3. MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; 3.3 HEALTH SCIENCES; Health policy and services; Infectious diseases; Public and environmental health; Epidemiology; Interdisciplinary

Publication Details

PERSPECTIVE ARTICLE

Frontiers in Public Health, 16 February 2017

Abstract

One Health (OH) positions health professionals as agents for change and provides a platform to manage determinants of health that are often not comprehensively captured in medicine or public health alone. However, due to the organization of societies and disciplines, and the sectoral allocation of resources, the development of transdisciplinary approaches requires effort and perseverance. Therefore, there is a need to provide evidence on the added value of OH for governments, researchers, funding bodies, and stakeholders. This paper outlines a conceptual framework of what OH approaches can encompass and the added values they can provide. The framework was developed during a workshop conducted by the “Network for Evaluation of One Health,” an Action funded by the European Cooperation in Science and Technology. By systematically describing the various aspects of OH, we provide the basis for measuring and monitoring the integration of disciplines, sectors, and stakeholders in health initiatives. The framework identifies the social, economic, and environmental drivers leading to integrated approaches to health and illustrates how these evoke characteristic OH operations, i.e., thinking, planning, and working, and require supporting infrastructures to allow learning, sharing, and systemic organization. It also describes the OH outcomes (i.e., sustainability, health and welfare, interspecies equity and stewardship, effectiveness, and efficiency), which are not possible to obtain through sectoral approaches alone, and their alignment with aspects of sustainable development based on society, environment, and economy.

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